Examining how countries can improve their efforts to prevent mother-to-child transmitting of HIV.

African delegates call on countries to accomplish more to prevent mother-to-child transmission of HIV Delegates from 15 African countries this week concluded a three-day workshop held in Nairobi, Kenya, examining how countries can improve their efforts to prevent mother-to-child transmitting of HIV, VOA Information reports. WHO Family and Reproductive Health Director Tigest Ketsela, who spoke at the meeting, said more than 85 % of kids in the world coping with HIV/AIDS can be found in sub-Saharan Africa, primarily due to mother-to-child transmission, according to VOA News. Ketsela attributed the raised %age to this population getting overlooked by weakened health systems in your community, VOA Information writes.Virginia Steen from Georgetown University Medical Center in Washington, DC, analyzed data from the Pittsburgh Scleroderma Database. This database includes demographic, scientific, autoantibody, organ involvement and survival details for 203 African-American and 2945 Caucasian scleroderma individuals noticed at the University of Pittsburgh INFIRMARY between 1972 and 2007. Findings show that African Americans had higher frequencies of specific scleroderma-specific autoantibodies in comparison to Caucasians: anti-U3-RNP , U1-RNP and anti-topoisomerase .